Job Hunting Season: Patience and Perseverance are your best friends

Hi all 🙂

It’s Sunday morning and I still feel like writing- this is a wonderful feeling as I have been struggling for years to get back into writing.

This morning, I feel inspired to write about my experiences with job hunting and dealing with the heartless bitch that comes along with it: rejection. 

At the moment, I have a secure job where I am learning a lot and feel content with my career progression. I want to write this post now as it took a whole lot of CV’s and cover letters to get to this point.

It’s not to say that I will always be in the secure position I am in the moment, but when the tough gets going regarding my career (and I am sure it will again at some point), I’d like to look back at this post as it is a reminder that we will always come out the other side.

Now going into my mid 20s, I have worked in various jobs since I have been 16. I worked part-time most of my university years and generally I never really struggled to find a job.

Then I graduated university and decided it was time to leave my retail job and find a ‘graduate’ career.

Long story short it took me nearly 6 months to find a full-time career I actually wanted during this job hunting period. I must have submitted 100+ applications, out of which I must have gotten asked to about 10 to 15 interviews. I made it through several interview rounds, or even achieving the final interview round, only to be told that I was good but not good enough (not the words used but that’s the just really). 

Rejection kept happening and I felt despaired and desperate for a full-time stable job.

Looking back at this tumultuous period of uncertainty in my life, I want to reflect on some of the mistakes I made during my job hunting season:

  1. I quickly grew impatient: After graduating university, I quickly started applying for graduate jobs in my degree sector and felt keen to leave my retail job. I had been at my retail job for nearly three years and I always enjoyed it, but I quickly grew resentful of it once university was over and it became a core part of my life. I was frustrated that I was applying for jobs and not getting any results, while still being stuck in the role I was desperate to leave. At the time, I thought the best idea was to quit my job and solely focus on my new job search. This was a terribly irresponsible idea of mine. I was suddenly financially unstable and had all the time in the world on my hands- I’d lie in bed all day submitting job applications and that was my life. Because I struggle with anxiety, this pattern of lying in bed all day was a dangerous place for me to be. I could notice I was becoming increasingly irritable and insecure.
  2. I was not thinking about what I wanted: Desperate to find a job, I applied for just about everything. My impatience meant I would quickly skim over a job ad and convince myself that it was my dream. Then, I would get contacted by the company and suddenly I took a step back and thought- why would I have ever applied for that job?
  3. I used the same CV and template cover letter for just about every application: This all boils down to impatience once again- my desperation to find a job meant I was hitting submit so quickly that I didn’t bother doing much research into the role or company (hence why I wasn’t hearing back from a lot of these places). And yes- I did make the mistake more than once where I forgot to change the company name in my cover letter.
  4. Putting all my eggs in one basket: I’d find a job that I was interested in and they showed genuine interest in me- suddenly I was all about that role and company and when rejection hit me via a telephone call I grew frustrated and became very sad.

 

My key lesson from all of this has been to persevere in the face of adversity- you can and I did overcome job rejection? You must be patient and you must think about what you want- as soon as you do that it is only a matter of time before the phone rings with some good news 🙂

 

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